UKCA mark replaces CE for UK in 2021

UKCA mark comes into effect from the 1st of January 2021

From the 1st of January 2021, the UK’s transition period out of the EU will come to an end. For some businesses, this means there have been things to get in order and have in place to conform to the new standards.

The UKCA mark will become the conformity marking for Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland), for most goods currently subject to the marking.

Product areas covered by UKCA marking:

  • Toy safety
  • Recreational craft and personal watercraft
  • Simple pressure vessels
  • Electromagnetic compatibility
  • Non-automatic weighing instruments
  • Measuring instruments
  • Lifts
  • ATEX
  • Radio equipment
  • Pressure equipment
  • Personal protective equipment
  • Gas appliances
  • Machinery
  • Outdoor noise
  • Ecodesign
  • Aerosols
  • Low voltage electrical equipment
  • Restriction of hazardous substance

The technical requirements to meet the UKCA marking standards are much the same as they are for the CE mark and, to allow businesses time to adjust, certain products will continue to be accepted into the UK without the mark until the 1st of January 2022.

When to use the UKCA marking?

There are some products that will require the UKCA marking immediately following the 1st of January 2021 if ALL of the following apply to your product:

  • is for the market in Great Britain,
  • is covered by legislation which requires the UKCA marking,
  • requires a mandatory third-party conformity assessment,
  • conformity assessment has been carried out by a UK conformity assessment body and you haven’t transferred,
  • your conformity assessment files from your UK body to an EU recognised body before 1 January 2021.

It is important to note that this rule will not apply to existing stock — for example, if your goods are fully manufactured and ready to place on the market in Great Britain before the 1st of January 2021.

How to use the UKCA marking?

In most cases, the UKCA marking will need to be placed on the product itself or on to the packaging, but in some cases, it may be placed on the manuals or on other supporting documents.

The following general rules apply:

  • UKCA markings must only be placed on a product by you as the manufacturer or your authorised representative (where allowed for in the relevant legislation),
  • when attaching the UKCA marking, you take full responsibility for your product’s conformity with the requirements of the relevant legislation,
  • you must only use the UKCA marking to show product conformity with the relevant UK legislation,
  • you must not place any marking or sign that misconstrues the meaning or form of the UKCA marking to third parties,
  • you must not attach other markings on the product which affect the visibility, legibility of the UKCA marking,
  • the UKCA marking cannot be placed on products unless there is a specific requirement to do so in the legislation.

From the 1st of January 2022, the CE marking will no longer be recognised in Great Britain for areas covered by this guidance and the UKCA marking. A product using the CE mark will still be allowed to sell in the UK as long as it has the UKCA mark and complies with the relevant UK rules.

The UKCA marking will not be recognised on the EU or Northern Ireland markets. Products currently requiring a CE marking for sale in the EU will continue to need a CE mark (and meet the other EU rules).

Both the CE and UKCA mark can be placed on a product as long as both are easily identifiable from one other and requirements of both the GB and EU legislation are met. For most online sellers, who sell in both the UK and the EU, this will have to be the default option.

It’s important to be prepared to use the UKCA marking from the 1st of January 2022 at the latest, depending on your product. Keeping the new guidelines in mind, you can start to prepare early and build this into your design process.

To discuss what the UKCA marking means for your business, please contact us for more information at info@lyte.uk.

For the official UK government guidelines, please visit – gov.uk/guidance

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